Information Magazine about Adoption, Complex Cases of Fertility & Surrogacy
FAQs
0
Menu

From a psychological point of view, is it believed that surrogacy can be a problem for both participants, that is to say, for the parents of intention as well as the pregnant woman and the foetus?

By Amalia Bayonas.
Last Update: 08/17/2015

Anything that is not purely "natural" and involves external intervention in reproductive matters requires mental processing work. This is even more the case when gestation takes place externally. Usually, it causes us some apprehension and even rejection. But when this reaction comes into conflict with the strong desire to have a child, we necessarily move on to evaluate other options and end up agreeing most of the time on the alternative or technique that provides a solution to our problem.

In addition to the reaction generated by the technique itself, then taking part in the psychological acceptance process are the cultural and family "internal mandates", the possible "stigma" of not being able to gestate, having to explain to third parts...which increase the difficulty of the subject.

As for the child, these tend to integrate life events according to how they are presented by their loved ones. If parents explain it naturally and focus on the joy of their birth, the child will not live it negatively. Children are born as blank books and we are the ones who write in them.

Suggested for you: What Is Surrogacy & How Does It Work? – Everything You Should Know.

 Amalia Bayonas
Amalia Bayonas
MD
Psychologist
Bachelor's Degree in Psychology from the University of Miami, Florida, with over 20 years experience in the treatment of psychological aspects associated with assisted reproduction patients. Organization of workshops and talks addressed to both infertile patients and professionals. Several research projects and campaigns for the prevention and emotional well-being. Head of Psychology Unit at clinic FIV Valencia (Spain).
License: PV 3734
Psychologist. Bachelor's Degree in Psychology from the University of Miami, Florida, with over 20 years experience in the treatment of psychological aspects associated with assisted reproduction patients. Organization of workshops and talks addressed to both infertile patients and professionals. Several research projects and campaigns for the prevention and emotional well-being. Head of Psychology Unit at clinic FIV Valencia (Spain). License: PV 3734.
We use own cookies and third party cookies to offer you personalized ads and gather statistical data. If you continue the navigation we understand that you accept our cookies policy.